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Harvard professor Clayton M. Christensen says outstanding companies can do everything right and still lose their market leadership -- or worse, disappear completely. And he not only proves what he says, he tells others how to avoid a similar fate. Focusing on "disruptive technology" -- the Honda Sup...

Harvard professor Clayton M. Christensen says outstanding companies can do everything right and still lose their market leadership -- or worse, disappear completely. And he not only proves what he says, he tells others how to avoid a similar fate.

Focusing on "disruptive technology" -- the Honda Super Cub, Intel's 8088 processor, or the hydraulic excavator, for example -- Christensen shows why most companies miss "the next great wave." Whether in electronics or retailing, a successful company with established products will get pushed aside unless managers know when to abandon traditional business practices. Using the lessons of successes and failures from leading companies, "The Innovator's Dilemma" presents a set of rules for capitalizing on the phenomenon of disruptive innovation.

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Number of Pages: 252

ISBN: 0875845851

ISBN-13: 9780875845852


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The most important business and product management book of the past fifty years. If you’re a technology PM and you haven’t read Christensen, do so right now.

“It’s fantastic,” Gurley said. “It’s really the core essence of why start-ups have an advantage. Products that are able to be disruptive get over-designed. They get feature-rich, they get complex, they get heavy. He added that “if you can design a product that exploits a desire o...

“It’s fantastic,” Gurley said. “It’s really the core essence of why start-ups have an advantage. Products that are able to be disruptive get over-designed. They get feature-rich, they get complex, they get heavy.

He added that “if you can design a product that exploits a desire of a subset of the customer base that doesn’t want that complexity, but wants this feature, you can bust in. I’ve seen that over, and over, and over.”

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