Paper
The intradermal (ID) space has been actively explored as a means for drug delivery and diagnostics that is minimally invasive. Microneedles or microneedle patches or microarray patches (MAPs) are comprised of a series of micrometer-sized projections that can painlessly puncture the skin and access th...

The intradermal (ID) space has been actively explored as a means for drug delivery and diagnostics that is minimally invasive. Microneedles or microneedle patches or microarray patches (MAPs) are comprised of a series of micrometer-sized projections that can painlessly puncture the skin and access the epidermal/dermal layer. MAPs have failed to reach their full potential because many of these platforms rely on dated lithographic manufacturing processes or molding processes that are not easily scalable and hinder innovative designs of MAP geometries that can be achieved. The DeSimone Laboratory has recently developed a high-resolution continuous liquid interface production (CLIP) 3D printing technology. This 3D printer uses light and oxygen to enable a continuous, noncontact polymerization dead zone at the build surface, allowing for rapid production of MAPs with precise and tunable geometries. Using this tool, we are now able to produce new classes of lattice MAPs (L-MAPs) and dynamic MAPs (D-MAPs) that can deliver both solid state and liquid cargos and are also capable of sampling interstitial fluid. Herein, we will explore how additive manufacturing can revolutionize MAP development and open new doors for minimally invasive drug delivery and diagnostic platforms.

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Exciting new work by @Stanford_ChEMH Institute Fellow @Joseph_DeSimone and coworkers just out @JACS_Au