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In this introductory textbook the author explains the key topics in cryptography. He takes a modern approach, where defining what is meant by -secure- is as important as creating something that achieves that goal, and security definitions are central to the discussion throughout. The author balances...

In this introductory textbook the author explains the key topics in cryptography. He takes a modern approach, where defining what is meant by -secure- is as important as creating something that achieves that goal, and security definitions are central to the discussion throughout.
The author balances a largely non-rigorous style -- many proofs are sketched only -- with appropriate formality and depth. For example, he uses the terminology of groups and finite fields so that the reader can understand both the latest academic research and -real-world- documents such as application programming interface descriptions and cryptographic standards. The text employs colour to distinguish between public and private information, and all chapters include summaries and suggestions for further reading.
This is a suitable textbook for advanced undergraduate and graduate students in computer science, mathematics and engineering, and for self-study by professionals in information security. While the appendix summarizes most of the basic algebra and notation required, it is assumed that the reader has a basic knowledge of discrete mathematics, probability, and elementary calculus.

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Number of Pages: 481

ISBN: 3319219359

ISBN-13: 9783319219356


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This book is similar in scope to the previous one, with less focus on provable security. There is still some presentation of more traditional game-based security, but this is slowly introduced, rather than being used pervasively. Unlike the previous book, there’s also a better co...

This book is similar in scope to the previous one, with less focus on provable security. There is still some presentation of more traditional game-based security, but this is slowly introduced, rather than being used pervasively.

Unlike the previous book, there’s also a better coverage of public key Cryptography. Many of the same topics as in “An Introduction to Mathematical Cryptography” are covered, but with more focus on algorithms rather than the mathematics.

The book also has some very nice presentation on more advanced topics, like Zero-Knowledge proofs and secure multi-party computation, as well as concrete examples, such as TLS certificates.

This book might even be a good introduction, but I think the material is hard enough to make this more suitable as a second book.

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