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This is Part 2 in a series on learning in ill-structured, novel domains. That said, this post may be read as a standalone. In our previous members-only post we talked about Cognitive Flexibility Theory (CFT), a theory of adaptive expertise in ill-structured domains. I explained the two central claim...

This is Part 2 in a series on learning in ill-structured, novel domains. That said, this post may be read as a standalone.

In our previous members-only post we talked about Cognitive Flexibility Theory (CFT), a theory of adaptive expertise in ill-structured domains. I explained the two central claims of the theory, but I don’t think I did a good job of articulating the core ideas, or why I considered them useful. As a result of several conversations over the past two weeks, I think I’ve figured out a way to explain CFT more compellingly; consider this piece a rewrite of last week but with the actionable recommendations added at the end.

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The most important point the article makes in my opinion is that first principles thinking has limits..