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In Bryson's biggest book, he confronts his greatest challenge: to understand—and, if possible, answer—the oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves. Taking as territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from...

In Bryson's biggest book, he confronts his greatest challenge: to understand—and, if possible, answer—the oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves. Taking as territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being us. To that end, he has attached himself to a host of the world’s most advanced (and often obsessed) archaeologists, anthropologists, and mathematicians, travelling to their offices, laboratories, and field camps. He has read (or tried to read) their books, pestered them with questions, apprenticed himself to their powerful minds. A Short History of Nearly Everythingis the record of this quest, and it is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it. Science has never been more involving or entertaining.

(From Goodreads)

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Number of Pages: 544

ISBN: 076790818X

ISBN-13: 9780767908184


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I’ve been reading “A Short History of Nearly Everything.” It’s very impressive to — you know, to read about people pondering how to figure out the weight of the Earth or something in the 18th century. SYNC VIDEO TO PARAGRAPH And you would think that minds that would do that woul...

I’ve been reading “A Short History of Nearly Everything.” It’s very impressive to — you know, to read about people pondering how to figure out the weight of the Earth or something in the 18th century.

SYNC VIDEO TO PARAGRAPH
And you would think that minds that would do that would do very well in financial matters. But, you know, if you remember, Isaac Newton spent a significant part of his life trying to turn lead into gold. And he might have made a good stockbroker.

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Hefty, highly researched and eminently readable.