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From the vogue for nubile models to the explosion in the juvenile crime rate, this modern classic of social history and media traces the precipitous decline of childhood in America today ˆ’and the corresponding threat to the notion of adulthood. Deftly marshaling a vast array of historical and demog...

From the vogue for nubile models to the explosion in the juvenile crime rate, this modern classic of social history and media traces the precipitous decline of childhood in America today ˆ’and the corresponding threat to the notion of adulthood.

Deftly marshaling a vast array of historical and demographic research, Neil Postman, author of Technopoly, suggests that childhood is a relatively recent invention, which came into being as the new medium of print imposed divisions between children and adults. But now these divisions are eroding under the barrage of television, which turns the adult secrets of sex and violence into popular entertainment and pitches both news and advertising at the intellectual level of ten-year-olds.

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Number of Pages: 192

ISBN: 0679751661

ISBN-13: 9780679751663


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In preparation for Write of Passage Summer Camp (which I'm building for kids aged 10-12 years old), I've been studying the sociology of childhood. In particular, I recommend two books: The Disappearance of Childhood by Neil Postman and Deschooling Society by Ivan Illich. Both of t...

In preparation for Write of Passage Summer Camp (which I'm building for kids aged 10-12 years old), I've been studying the sociology of childhood. In particular, I recommend two books: The Disappearance of Childhood by Neil Postman and Deschooling Society by Ivan Illich. Both of them wrote in the 70s, and offer perspectives that you won't find in today's mainstream commentary. Even if you aren't interested in childhood, I recommend both authors' backlog of books about the social effects of technology and industrialization.

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